Teaching For Critical Thinking

Teaching For Critical Thinking-4
On the other hand, if a student spells some words incorrectly, do not correct them.Encourage learners to use the English they know and are comfortable using in their stories. After students have written their stories, give everyone a chance to share what they have written.

On the other hand, if a student spells some words incorrectly, do not correct them.Encourage learners to use the English they know and are comfortable using in their stories. After students have written their stories, give everyone a chance to share what they have written.

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This week’s Teacher’s Corner offers an LEA activity that can be conducted in the classroom using minimal resources. Begin class by telling students: “Today you are going to talk about a special meal you ate with your family.” Direct their attention to the prompt and questions on the board. Use the questions on the board to guide the discussion. As students write, walk around and support them by helping them write down exactly what they say.

If you have a student who wants to know how to spell something correctly, you can tell them the correct spelling.

Have each group discuss what they expect the story might be about based on the title and on what they know about Edgar Allen Poe. Ask the class to share what they’ve discussed in groups, and write the ideas on the board.

For example, one group might say they know Edgar Allen Poe wrote scary stories so they expect this story to be scary. Tell the class that one student will read three paragraphs aloud to the group. When everyone has finished reading, ask students to discuss the questions written on the board in their groups. Finally, bring the class back together and ask for some responses to the questions. The reading should be easy enough for the students to successfully complete the activity, but also difficult enough for them to find the activity challenging.

Reading aloud is a popular reading task in English language classrooms.

The task typically targets skills associated with reading, such as fluency, word recognition, and pronunciation.The teacher becomes the scribe and writes the story on the board, and the students can see their experiences taking shape in writing.This activity can be extended to include a visual component.Tell the second group that they are visiting the story gallery, and they can go around the room reading the different stories and asking the authors questions.After students have circulated, the groups can switch tasks.Have one student tell their story out loud while the other students in the group write down the story as they hear it.An additional variation could involve a whole-class shared experience.Some of the activities and tasks may seem familiar as they are based on long-established language teaching techniques. Learners must understand, examine, analyze, evaluate, and create while using English to complete a task or activity.The activities are designed to support authentic language use while also encouraging critical thinking. The result is a language skills task or activity that promotes critical thinking skills.In this week’s Teacher’s Corner, a read-aloud task is used as the framework for a more demanding task that targets critical thinking skills as well.The task asks learners to process and then summarize the content of a story while reading aloud in a group. Begin by putting students in the groups planned before class. Tell the class that today they are going to read a story by Edgar Allen Poe called “The Black Cat.” 3.

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