Battle Of Algiers Essay Question

Battle Of Algiers Essay Question-20
This is not the place to rehearse a critique of Bigelow’s film, except to draw your attention to the final refrain of her statement to media, which touches on my earlier point about the nature of human duty: “Bin Laden wasn’t defeated by superheroes zooming down from the sky; he was defeated by ordinary Americans who fought bravely even as they sometimes crossed moral lines, who labored greatly and intently, who gave all of themselves in both victory and defeat, in life and in death, for the defense of this nation.” What Bigelow seems to want to make clear is that she is aware of the moral and legal problems with torture, but that she agrees with Pontecorvo’s French colonisers, in that torture is just part of "the necessary consequences” that “the defense of this nation” demands.

This is not the place to rehearse a critique of Bigelow’s film, except to draw your attention to the final refrain of her statement to media, which touches on my earlier point about the nature of human duty: “Bin Laden wasn’t defeated by superheroes zooming down from the sky; he was defeated by ordinary Americans who fought bravely even as they sometimes crossed moral lines, who labored greatly and intently, who gave all of themselves in both victory and defeat, in life and in death, for the defense of this nation.” What Bigelow seems to want to make clear is that she is aware of the moral and legal problems with torture, but that she agrees with Pontecorvo’s French colonisers, in that torture is just part of "the necessary consequences” that “the defense of this nation” demands.That is to say, whilst Pontecorvo might have shown the suffering of torture and the necessity of terror from the perspective of the Algerians, Bigelow sought to make a case for how and why the Americans were justified in deploying torture against aggressors .

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But what the film also shows is something Pontecorvo could not escape: terror may respond to oppression and torture, but it can also produce it. In an interview decades after the film was released, Pontecorvo noted the care that was taken to have the “same music for French and Algerian dead”, as well as the absence of any single protagonist, as if to say: all human life matters. We see that in each scene where Le Pointe is tasked with executing individual targets on the street, he always makes sure they can see his face – putting himself, and the entire resistance (history suggests), at risk.

As George Orwell reasoned, “a simple weapon – so long as there is no answer to it – gives claws to the weak”. Soon the entire Arab population builds to a mad fervor. But at the same time, it is notable how the Algerian characters are often afforded displays of empathy, courage, togetherness and honour, whilst the French for the most part, are not. It is not until he’s the only one left standing that he resorts to terror.

In defense of a deeper humanity, I am of the view that our response to Bigelow should correspond with our times, not resort to asking Pontecorvo.

For how much longer can we let our governments decide both unilaterally, and in secret, who is and isn’t inside the circle of our moral community?

If you answer ‘yes’, you must accept all the necessary consequences”.

Given that the use of torture is the predominant feature of both films, it is no surprise, therefore, that many have sought to reignite these themes within Pontecorvo’s the .Terror, seen from this perspective, is morally and politically not only necessary, but justified.Based on a number of interviews since making the film, we know that the was very much written and constructed with this intention in mind – it was always a piece of political art. To understand why, come to a rare showing of this film.” That the French and the Algerians are both shown using terror in the film, including in civilian areas, is seemingly a moot point for the Pentagon. And throughout the film he really doesn’t “do that kind of thing”.All states and peoples must have the capacity to harm – to see off threats and feel secure.But at the same time, every actor must also develop the unwavering commitment to avoid causing any unnecessary harm and suffering, and arguably also too, the positive obligation to help those who find themselves in harm’s way.What we can and must return to for is a sense of perspective: the longer we take to ask ourselves these sorts of questions, the longer this practice will continue.* Andrew Linklater introduced the field of International Relations to the conceptualization of “harm” used in this essay.may be read, therefore, as an exploration of how all peoples and states must balance these (at times competing) responsibilities, while at the same time inviting viewers to ask how we individually and collectively internalize harm in our political and moral consciousness.Pontecorvo’s message is made plain when he has the head of France’s counterinsurgency unit parade the capture of a senior Algerian figure to world news media.For , Gillo Pontecorvo and cinematographer Marcello Gatti took from the cinematic masters of Soviet Montage and Italian neorealism and experimented with various styles and techniques including shooting in stark black and white cinematography, casting non-actors in the roles of its Algerians, and shooting everything live and on location including Algiers and in the European quarters of Casbah; all which would help create an authentic look of newsreel and documentary like footage.When the film was released this effect convinced audiences into believing they were watching real life war footage and so Americans released a disclaimer for the film that said "Not one foot of newsreel was used." In a film that was cast almost entirely with non-actors, Pontecorvo decided to use a Paris stage actor to play Col.

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    The Battle of Algiers is a 1966 Italian-Algerian historical war film co-written and directed by Gillo. Lost Command, a commercial film on the same topic released the same year. Official website at Rialto Pictures · The Battle of Algiers Bombs and Boomerangs an essay by Peter Matthews at the Criterion Collection.…

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    Sep 1, 2008. The Battle of Algiers took a pitiless look at the war for Algerian. it thrilled me again as I watched the film earlier this year, but it raised questions as well. and essays has celebrated and investigated this rich historic legacy.…

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    The 1966 classic The Battle of Algiers is a story that highlights the. the lens that Frantz Fanon provides in his essay titled On Violence. Where the question of blame on the French becomes difficult is on a micro-level.…

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    May 11, 2007. Then the keyword was "Arab" and it easy to forget that as recently as the first Iraq war in 1991, the question was whether a putative brotherhood.…

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    Sep 29, 2016. The 1966 film classic 'The Battle of Algiers' -- getting a shiny new. “The Battle of Algiers” offers no reassuring answers to these questions, but to watch. In his essay for the 2004 Criterion Collection DVD release, British film.…

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    Jan 10, 2017. The fiftieth anniversary of the release of The Battle of Algiers Gillo. Ben-Ghiat and others have shown that questions of realism and the overlap between. Essays Cambridge, MA Harvard University Press, 2000, 282–92.…

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